Hacker’s Raid a Page-Turner

Hackers RaidHacker’s Raid by fellow author and friend Jared McVay is an action-packed, energetic novel. Jared is a master storyteller and his talent comes alive on the pages of his second novel. I enjoyed the adventures of Justin Hacker in his quest to break his brother, then his father and uncle out of a notorious Mexican prison. Jared often offers buyers a packet of tissues when they buy one of his books, and you may just need one for this book too.

Jared, tell us how you came to write a western?

I had just finished my novel, The Legend of Joe, Willy and Red and was basking in the great reviews it was receiving, when my wife asked me, “So, what are you going to write next?”

I told her I hadn’t thought about it, and she replied, “Why don’t you write a western? You’ve read a ton of them and you’ve traveled throughout the south west, plus, as a young man you worked on a ranch and did some rodeo riding, didn’t you? And haven’t you said at least a dozen times, one of these days I’m going to write a western.”

She was right on all accounts, so the next day I sat down and began to write. After the first chapter, I left it for a few days, then came back and deleted the opening, which was totally wrong, and started over. Not sure why it was wrong, just knew that it was.

This time I turned on a switch in my head and watched a movie and wrote down what I saw. It was just that easy. The story, the characters the location was all, right there in the movie inside my head.

Of course the editing was the hard part – cleaning up all my grammar errors.

Synopsis: After a seven year exile, Justin Hacker returns to his hometown of Nogales, Arizona to try to break his younger brother out of a Mexican prison where he awaits the hangman’s noose for crimes he didn’t commit. But first, Justin must overcome certain obstacles, such as a town bully, a Mexican bandito and his gang, an Indian attack, a father who has vowed to shoot him on site should he ever return, and match wits with a maniacal prison warden who hates gringos. And if that isn’t enough, after several twists of fate, Justin leads the whole town back across the border in an attempt to rescue both his father and uncle from the dreaded Mexican prison where they now await the hangman’s noose.

Reviews:

“A wonderful read. Jared’s engaging characters come to life in this superb western as Hacker’s Raid thunders through an ever increasing narrative of nonstop action and adventure… Hacker’s Raid proves Jared’s command of storytelling remains unrivaled.”
Howard Loring, Author of “Beyond the Elastic Limit” & “Piercing the Elastic Limit”

Hacker’s Raid is the latest book by “the master story teller” Jared McVay. I was riveted from the first page. The pace of the story, the characters, all played their part in an adventure that I just didn’t want to put down and I did not want to end. I am looking forward to the next installment of Jared’s foray in the western genre.”
Rob Krabbe, Author

I’m not usually a fan of westerns, but I found, “Hacker’s Raid” interesting and engaging. The characters are very personable, whether hero or villain – and real! They led me through a story laced with smiles, tears and even a gasp or two, always leaving me wanting more. A very worth while read.
Ann Schwarz – ProofreaderHeadshot003

Jared McVay is a veteran Hollywood movie and television actor, who now lives in Bellingham, WA. He has had a long-time love affair with the old west and enjoyed roles as an actor in western films on the screen and stage. He has published several western short stories, a children’s book Bears, Bicycles and Broomsticks, and a historical novel, The Legend of Joe, Willy and Red.

Follow him on his website and his blog, Jared McVay’s Scribblings.

Published in: on July 19, 2013 at 6:40 am  Comments (2)  
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Celebrate With a Free Book and My Recommended Books List

ballons

Come and help me celebrate my birthday, which is Monday the 10th, and I will give some lucky commenter  your choice of Cowgirl Dreams or Follow the Dream.

All you have to do is share this post on Facebook, Twitter or any of your other social networks, then leave a comment with the links. I will put your name in the Cowgirl hat for the drawing! The more links you post, the more times I’ll put your name in. (Paper books limited to the U.S., out of the U.S. will receive an electronic version.)

And, my Christmas gift to you is FREE SHIPPING on orders for autographed books from now until Dec. 25! (Also in the U.S.)

Books make great Christmas gifts. They are inexpensive, they take the reader on great adventures, and you can read them again as many times as you’d like (even share them with friends and family!)

Here are a few of my recommendations:

Tubob-CoverTubob: Two Years in West Africa with the Peace Corps, by Mary E. Trimble. This memoir describes her and her husband’s life in third-world country The Gambia. As Peace Corps volunteers, they struggle with cultural differences and do what they can for people who are often reluctant to change. Hardships abound, but so do strong friendships. Humor is abundant, but so is misery. Early on, the newlyweds were told that Peace Corps would either make or break a marriage. Mary and Bruce find out how true that is.  To learn more about Tubob, click here  To order Tubob, click here

Dividing SeasonThe Dividing Season, a novel by Karen Casey-Fitzjerrell. In The Dividing Season, Karen Casey Fitzjerrell celebrates the redemptive qualities of the human spirit and raises the question:  What are you willing to give up in order to calm those  secret longings that beg for something more?     Near the end of her life, Nell Miggins decided all her years spent on earth could be divided into two parts, each equally content but separated by a season of bewildering uncertainty and death. She remembered the stinging edge of desperation the day the dividing season began and understood clearly that if it hadn’t been for the Windmiller she’d have lived the last half of her life as a shriveled old fool never knowing the grace and simple joy of just being. Order here

wrecker1Raising Wrecker by Summer Wood, A WILLA Literary Award Winner. By turns funny, moving, and gripping, Wrecker is the story of a nearly-broken boy whose presence turns a motley group of isolated eccentrics into a real family. Real enough to make mistakes. Real enough to stick together in spite of everything ready to tear them apart. Order here

Moonshine Murder coverMoonshine Murder a Young Adult novel by Erin Gray.  When seventeen-year-old Lenora Giovanni’s father dies from tainted moonshine, leaving her alone, she is forced into a life of danger. Lenora is determined to find whoever sold the poison to her father–a determination that leads her into working as an undercover agent in the town of Durango, Colorado. Falling in love with a bootlegger, how will Lenora choose, with her head or her heart? Order here

The InheritorsThe Inheritors by Judith Kirscht, the author of Nowhere Else to Go. Raised in Chicago’s Latino working class community during the Sixties, Alicia Barron uncovers her mother’s Caucasian roots when she inherits a time-worn mansion, the remnant of the estate of a Chicago industrialist who, she discovers, is her grandfather. Her search of the house takes her into the lives of past generations of women whose love carried them across forbidden boundaries, and into the conflict of class, nationality, and race that is the history of the city itself. The identity she finds there, however, leads to increasing conflict with her first great love, Ricardo Moreno, who wants Alicia to reject her gringo roots. Order here

Can you add any books to this list?

Elizabeth’s Christmas Eve Gift

Elizabeth’s Christmas Eve Gift is a vintage Christmas story by Chesna L. Smith.

As if they were playing a game of verbal tag, the members of the Miller family always tried to be the first to shout “Christmas Eve Gift!”

Spend Christmas Eve with young cowgirl, Elizabeth on the  Miller ranch in the 1920s to discover how in the midst of everyday chores, good ol’ cowboy humor and the ranch animals remind her of the true meaning of Christmas.

From the wide-eyed wonder of the little believer to the wiry grandmother with a sparkle in her eyes as she muses, “My dad told me that when I was little too,” the heartwarming story has generated responses from young and old alike.

Author Chesna Smith says:
The inspiration came from a story that my husband’s grandmother (Elizabeth Miller Smith) was told when she was a little girl.  Another family tradition was woven in when, after marrying my husband, I discovered that both our families grew up playing a peculiar game on Christmas Eve Morning!  Every member of the family would try to be the first to shout “Christmas Eve Gift.”  In theory if you “got” someone by saying it first, they were supposed to give you a present early.  However, no one ever got around to “paying up.”  The victory was in the thrill of knowing that they would have to wait a whole year before they had a chance to get you back. Neither family really knows where the tradition came from.

Chesna, who grew up in Oklahoma, says, “For as long as I can remember I wanted to grow up and be a cowgirl,  I don’t know if I will ever get there, but it sure has been fun trying.

Illustrators are Shawna Wright,  Clayton, NM, and Ben Miller, nephew of the late Elizabeth Miller Smith, who lives on the Miller Ranch where this story took place.

Come along with Elizabeth and see how in the midst of everyday life she discovers the greatest gift of all.

Follow the Dream Wins WILLA Award

I am excited and honored to announce that my second novel, Follow the Dream, sequel to EPIC-award winning Cowgirl Dreams, has won the national WILLA award.

Both novels are based on my grandmother who rode bucking stock in Montana rodeos during the 1920s and ’30s.

Named for Pulitzer prize-winning Willa Cather, one of our country’s foremost authors, the WILLA is awarded by the Women Writing the West organization. It is given annually for outstanding literature featuring women’s stories set in the west. Awards are chosen by a distinguished panel of librarians and presented at the annual WWW Conference.

This year’s conference will be held Oct. 14-16 at the Embassy Suites in Lynnwood, WA. Keynote speakers are Nancy Pearl and Ellen Waterston. The conference features workshops on writing, publishing, and marketing, panel discussions, a bookstore, and agent/publisher appointments. All writers are welcome. For information and to register, go to the WWW website.

Follow the Dream synopsis:

Nettie Moser’s dreams are coming true. She’s married to her cowboy, Jake, they have plans for a busy rodeo season, and she has a once in a lifetime opportunity to rodeo in London with the Tex Austin Wild West Troupe.

But life during the Great Depression brings unrelenting hardships and unexpected family responsibilities. Nettie must overcome challenges to her lifelong rodeo dreams, cope with personal tragedy, survive drought, and help Jake keep their horse herd from disaster.

Will these challenges break this strong woman?

To read an excerpt from Follow the Dream or Cowgirl Dreams, go to my website at Heidi M. Thomas.

Review: Follow the Dream

Rodeo cowgirl gets hitched, faces hard times

By T.J. GILLES – For The Outpost, Billings MT

After finally obtaining the right to vote, American women in the 1920s were flexing their liberation in a variety of ways.

Some, such as Montana’s Jeannette Rankin, had gone into the halls of Congress. Amelia Earhart proved she could fly airplanes with the best of the boys.

Multitudes merely bobbed their hair and became flappers in the speakeasies and blind pigs which sprang up in dark places after the women’s vote helped usher in a quaint Shiite law known as Prohibition.

In the West, women rodeoed.

Not confined to sissified events such as barrel racing or goat-tying, Montana women such as Alice and Margie Greenough, Fanny Sperry Steele and Marie Gibson were busting broncs head-to-head with their male counterparts. They and trick rider Trixie McCormick were showing their stuff in Madison Square Garden and before the crowned heads of Europe in Wild West shows.

Heidi M. Thomas’ grandmother, Olive May “Tootsie” Bailey grew up in the Sweetgrass-Cut Bank area near Montana’s border with Alberta, loved her damned old rodeo and competed alongside the aforementioned legends.

She and her husband, Otto Gasser, ranched along the Hi-Line and then in Garfield County.

As Thomas says she visualized it:

“A petite young woman mounts a 750-pound steer, and hangs on to nothing but a rope tight-wrapped around one hand. That she stays on this bucking, twisting, snorting beast for ten seconds, eight seconds or even two seconds, seems like a miracle.

“This is the intriguing picture of my grandmother I have carried in the back of my mind since I was a little girl. Ever since I began to explore fiction writing as opposed to journalism, this idea has been nagging at me, telling me I needed to write about her.”

As a girl, Thomas heard of her grandma’s sagas. “She died when I was only 12, so I never got to talk to her about her life as a rodeo cowgirl,” Thomas writes on her extensive website.

“But she had taken many pictures, created photo albums, scrapbook and journals, from which a story emerged. My Dad told me stories about his growing up in the 1920s and ’30s. The spark grew to a flame, and I was hooked.”

Living in Washington state in 1999, Thomas began setting down “Cowgirl Dreams,” basing the lead character, Nettie Bradley, on her grandmother.

Ten years later, she was back in Montana on book tours for the book. She’s back again this year with the story of Nettie’s early married life in “Follow the Dream” and has another title on the next generation, “American Dreams” currently in revision.

According to her website, yet another novel, “Rescuing Samantha” is in progress.

In the sequel to “Cowgirl Dreams,” Nettie has been married (against parental resistance) to her cowboy, Jake Moser, and they share their dreams of rodeoing together and even raising a family on the circuit, as real-life Marie and Tom Gibson did in the 1920s and 1930s.

But into each dream, a little reality must fall and a lot of reality fell upon the Montana landscape in those years. The state’s fledgling homestead agriculture began its death spiral in the 1920s because of a post-World War drop in prices and persistent drought on the highly leveraged land.

Banks failed and insect plagues of biblical proportions seemingly descended whenever there was sufficient rain to grow a crop worth destroying.

A reverse immigration occurred, as families pooled resources to send one of two members to the coast to earn enough money to buy train fare for remaining family members to escape ravaged Montana. Livestock –- and people – often were left to fend for themselves.

Thus, Nettie and Jake move from ranch to ranch and in 1931, decide to trail their herd of 50 horses two mountain ranges and 350 miles from Sunburst to Salmon, Idaho, where there’s grass.

The struggle to keep body, soul, marriage and horse herd together marks the saga that is “Follow the Dream.”

Thomas’ books are classified in the “young adult” category and Treble Heart Books is a Christian publishing house, which in this case means there’s no cussing or violence. Thoroughly vetted, it should interest readers of all ages.

Published in: on December 29, 2010 at 11:36 pm  Comments (4)  
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Book Review: Gold Under Ice

Gold Under Ice is Carol Buchanan’s second novel based on the Vigilantes of Montana. Descended from Montana pioneers and homesteaders, Carol is a nonfiction writer and student of Montana history who turned to historical fiction in God’s Thunderbolt, The Vigilantes of Montana, which won the 2009 Western Writers of America Spur award for Best First Novel.

Gold Under Ice continues the story of frontier attorney Daniel Stark, who rescues a man from drowning only to learn that his autocratic grandfather sent the man to bring him back to New York with gold to pay his family’s debt. But Dan does not have enough gold to rescue the family from their financial burden. If he joins the gold traders, he could make enough to pay the debt and secure his family’s future. Or he could lose everything and be branded a traitor to the Union.

This story grabbed me on the first page and kept my nose between its pages until I devoured the last word. It is a quality book—from the cover photo to Carol’s excellent writing. It is obviously well-researched and well-written. Carol weaves in Civil War history, how gold is traded and its parallels to gambling in an interesting and captivating way.

Her characters are well-developed, with distinct, clear voices, and relationships are strongly drawn. Dan’s dilemma—his duty to his family back home in New York versus his new family on the frontier—catches at the reader’s heartstrings and raises the stakes for our hero. Carol builds the conflict with Dan’s strong, patriarch grandfather as well as the elements, the lawless frontier and basic survival.

Gold Under Ice, published by Missouri Breaks Press, is an excellent read, one I highly recommend. It is available through Carol’s Website and in Kindle and paperback versions on Amazon .

New Release: Follow The Dream

At last, the long-awaited sequel to Cowgirl Dreams is available!

Nettie Moser’s dreams are coming true. She’s married to her cowboy, Jake, they have plans for a busy rodeo season, and she has a once in a lifetime opportunity to rodeo in London with the Tex Austin Wild West Troupe.

But life during the Great Depression brings unrelenting hardships and unexpected family responsibilities. Nettie must overcome challenges to her lifelong rodeo dreams, cope with personal tragedy, survive drought, and help Jake keep their horse herd from disaster.

Will these challenges break this strong woman?

This sequel to Cowgirl Dreams is based on the life of the author’s grandmother, a real Montana cowgirl.

Advance praise for Follow the Dream:

In her poignant tale of Nettie Moser’s diligent pursuit of a dream, Heidi Thomas gives a stunning example of what it means to “Cowgirl Up.” FOLLOW THE DREAM is a dynamic story of a woman’s strength and determination that is sure to inspire as well as entertain.—Sandi Ault, award-winning author of the WILD Mystery Series, including WILD INDIGO, WILD INFERNO, WILD SORROW and WILD PENANCE

“Follow the Dream draws the reader into the lives of tough Montana ranchers, Nettie and Jake Moser. Dreams come and go, but their ranching life goes on with hardships and struggles for basic survival, but also with abiding love and humor. A wonderful story of courage and endurance.” –Mary Trimble, award-winning author of Tenderfoot, Rosemount and McClellan’s Bluff.

“…a bittersweet novel with its accurate depiction of the lives of cowgirls in 1920s Montana and its tender portrait of a marriage.” –Mary Clearman Blew, award-winning author of Jackalope Dreams.

To preview and order an autographed copy of the book, go to Heidi M. Thomas’ website Or the publisher, Treble Heart Books.

Published in: on October 3, 2010 at 8:39 pm  Comments (9)  
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National Banned Books Week

I just discovered Chase’s Calendar of Events. Today is R.E.A.D. in America Day and for the next week it is Banned Books Week (Sept 25-Oct 2). See www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/bannedbooksweek/index.cfm

Today is also National Book Festival, National Mall, Washington, DC. See www.loc.gov/bookfest/

And it is Nobel Prize-winning author William Faulkner’s birthday (1897-1962).

The List

Here are 10 books that have been banned and challenged all throughout the United States.

  1. The Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger—Ever since it was first published, The Catcher in the Rye has been targeted by censors all across the country. Back in 1960, a teacher was fired for assigning this book to her class. In 1963, parents in Ohio protested the book for being obscene. This continued for many years, and the book is still challenged to this day. Just last year, it was challenged in the Big Sky High School in Montana.
  2. To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee—To Kill a Mockingbird has been challenged and banned in many schools across the country for containing profanity, racial slurs, rape, and other “trashy” behavior.
  3. Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck—Everyone from the KKK to a range of high schools has challenged this classic. The book contains racial slurs, profanity, and depressing themes.
  4. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark TwainRacial slurs are the biggest reason Huck Finn has been banned and taken out of numerous classrooms across the country. Even in schools where it hasn’t been officially banned, there are teachers who remove it from their classrooms just to prevent any controversy.
  5. The Harry Potter series, JK Rowling—According to the American Library Association, the Harry Potter series ranks as the most challenged books from the past decade. Christian parents all across the US want Harry Potter banned for its witchcraft themes.
  6. Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut—Not only has Slaughterhouse Five been challenged, banned, and removed from required reading in dozens of cities across the country, the book was actually burned in Drake, North Dakota in 1973.
  7. The Color Purple, Alice Walker—Why is The Color Purple constantly challenged? Let’s count the reasons: troubling race relations, human sexuality themes, questions about man’s relationship with God, inappropriate language, violence, drug abuse, and countless other reasons.
  8. Beloved, Toni Morrison—Charges for Beloved range from it being to violent to it depicting inappropriate topics of bestiality, sex, and racism. It was most recently pulled from an AP English class at Eastern High School in Louisville, Kentucky after parents complained about its content.
  9. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou—Coming in at #6 on the most challenged books of the last decade, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings has been a target of censors for the past 40 years. The book’s graphic depiction of racism and rape ensure it will always be challenged.
  10. Ulysses, James Joyce—Not only was Ulysses banned from the United States in 1918, it was also banned in Canada, England, and Ireland. Most recently, Ulysses made headlines again after a web comic version of it was temporarily rejected by Apple from its App store.

What is your favorite Banned book?

Published in: on September 26, 2010 at 2:23 am  Comments (4)  
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The Horse That Wouldn’t Trot

This entertaining and informative book by Rose Miller is not only a fascinating history of Tennessee Walking Horses, but also contains delightful anecdotes about her trials and tribulations in breeding, training and showing horses. By the end of the book, I felt like I knew her family and horses like neighbors, experiencing their successes, joys with births and sorrows in death.

A back injury led Rose to the Walkers’ smooth gait and their dependability for pleasure riding or for show. She shares her soul-deep love for the animals and how she relates and communicates with the horse’s mysterious mind. For example, the stallion who dug a hole under the fence to get to a mare, or certain stallion’s preference for mares of a particular color. Or the show horse who associated the words “mail box” with getting close to an object and standing still, a valuable training tool.

The book includes great photos of Rose’s beautiful horses in shows, in parades and of her prize show stallion posing with a bride in full wedding attire for a bridal supplement to the newspaper.

Rose has done a good job of building tension in writing about the show competitions. She also explains the history of the Tennessee Walkers, how their distinctive gait was bred into a more “showy” step and the unsavory practice of “soring” horses (applying caustic chemicals and chains and more) to make them step higher to thrill the audiences and win the competitions.

When I was growing up on a ranch in eastern Montana, my horse was a Tennessee Walking Horse, a red roan named Strawberry. He had a wonderful, easy gait that I always describe as like riding a rocking chair. But although he was a great kid’s horse, very laid back, I always thought he was a bit lazy. We always fell way behind the other horses when they were trotting out to the pasture. Now I understand it was because Walkers don’t trot and their gait doesn’t match. I also now understand the term “barn sour,” because while we fell behind on the way to the pasture, Strawberry would be out in the lead when heading home. A lesson learned too late!

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and recommend it to horse owners as well as readers who simple have an interest in horses and their varied traits and personalities. The Horse That Wouldn’t Trot is available on Rose’s Website and at Amazon.com

Rose Miller’s next book is Mules, Mules and More Mules: The Adventures and Misadventures of a First Time Mule Owner, which will be coming out this fall.

Rose and Praise Hallelujah, her prize stallion

The Horse That Wouldn’t Trot: A Life with Tennessee Walking Horses: Lessons Learned and Memories Shared

This entertaining and informative book by Rose Miller is not only a fascinating history of Tennessee Walking Horses, but also contains delightful anecdotes about her trials and tribulations in breeding, training and showing horses. By the end of the book, I felt like I knew her family like neighbors, experiencing successes, new life and death.

A back injury led Rose to the Walkers’ smooth gait and dependability for pleasure riding or for show. She shares her soul-deep love for the animals and how she relates and communicates with the horse’s mysterious mind. For example, the stallion who dug a hole under the fence to get to a mare, or certain stallion’s preference for mares of a particular color. Or the show horse who associated the words “mail box” with getting close to an object and standing still, a valuable training tool.

The book includes great photos of Rose’s beautiful horses, in shows, in parades and one of her prize show stallion posing with a bride in full wedding attire for a bridal supplement to the newspaper.

Rose has done a good job of building tension in writing about the show competitions. She also explains the history of the Tennessee Walkers, how their distinctive gait was bred into a more “showy” step and the unsavory practice of “soring” horses to make them step higher to win more.

My horse when I was growing up on a ranch in eastern Montana was a Tennessee Walking Horse, a red roan named Strawberry. He had a wonderful, easy gait that I always describe as like riding a rocking chair. But although he was a great kid’s horse, very laid back, I always thought he was a bit lazy. We always fell way behind the other horses when they were trotting out to the pasture. Now I understand it was because Walkers don’t trot. I also understand the term “barn sour,” because while we fell behind on the way to the pasture, Strawberry would be out in the lead when heading home.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and recommend it to horse owners as well as readers who are just interested in horses and their varied traits and personalities. The Horse That Wouldn’t Trot is available at

Rose Miller’s next book is

Pirated Blogs

Not long ago I had a very nice review written on Cowgirl Dreams by Jill Williamson on Goodreads.com. Then one day, as I scrolled through my “Google Alerts” messages for “Cowgirl Dreams,” I found the following post. Apparently it was translated into another language and then re-translated back into English, probably using computer translation software. It’s actually quite hilarious to see the equivalent words and phrases it came up with. Note my last name (no idea how Meter came from Thomas) and the name of my publisher, Treble Heart Books…

Reappraisal: Cowgirl Dreams by Heidi Meter

Reappraisal by Jill Williamson

Therein 1920 ‘s coming-of-age western, fourteen-year-old Nettie Brady desires to be a cowgirl to a higher degree anything. Her mother considers that it Holds overly unsafe for a fille and that Nettie demands to be larning how to maintain a place. But Nettie hates stitching and cookery. Justly sitting gives her pleasance in life. She makes n’t ever desire to be some slow homemaker lodged inside all day.

As Nettie turns upward, she gets some chances to attend the rodeo, but her mother makes n’t look to soften much to the thought. The summertime of her 16th yr, Nettie get Holds a business sitting horses for a well-favored immature cowpoke called Jake. Her feelings for Jake turn over clip, and Nettie gets to worry. She makes n’t desire to be bound downwards to anyone, but she Holds ne’er holded feelings like this for anyone. Could Jake be the one for her? And if so, would that intend she ‘d should give upward her dreaming of being a rodeo cowgirl?

This was a merriment narration. I cared seeing Nettie ‘s path on a 1920 ‘s spread. I loved the polite fashion people handled each other back so. The rodeo scenes were interesting and I was rooting for Nettie to had best. It was playfulness to read about horses you bet they got developed. I likewise wished the romance and Nettie ‘s position on not desiring to get bound downward in matrimony. I happened her standard refreshing, and sweetly naive. I likewise admired her finding and passionateness for sitting, but her noncompliance got a trifle frustrating. Initially I maked n’t mind this about her. She was immature then raddled to sitting that it add up that she ‘d locomote against her parents. But after a patch, it but beleaguer me and doed her less appealing. Like she was throwing conniption if she maked n’t get her manner. Disregarding, I advocate this tale to misses who love sitting horses, rodeo, and a bit old Occident romance.

Age Orbit: 16 and upwards
Genre: Historical Fiction
Constituent of a Series: no
Pages: 260
Publisher: Soprano Bosom Books
Relinquished: 2008

Next: An author interview I conducted with Liz Adair.

Published in: on February 13, 2010 at 12:21 am  Comments (2)  
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