On the Road to Prescott

Moving Truck 1January 16, 2013: the moving truck pulls away from Mount Vernon, WA with all our worldly possessions (most of them anyway!) and we pack what we need for two and a half months interim living before we actually move into our new home in Chino Valley, AZ.

We spend a couple of days in town to tie up loose ends and say good-bye to friends, then on Saturday the 19th we take off in the early morning fog, which lasted until North Bend. We saw sun for awhile but then were back in heavy fog through Pendleton, OR, a disappointment because I really would like to have seen the famous rodeo town a little better.

foggy driveThis was my view for 1,400 miles (the back end of a U-haul trailer).

Just as I was laughing at the “Scenic Viewpoint” signs as we climbed Deadman Pass over the Blue Mountains south of Pendleton on I-84, we suddenly broke out into the sun! Yippee! I felt a huge weight lifted and what a gorgeous view!

mts PendletonThe summit is at 4,193 feet

We stopped to rest for the night in Boise, ID, finding a frosty 1 degree temperature! We’re not used to that any more! I wondered what I had done with my longjohns!

After leaving Idaho, we continued south on Highway 93, the infamous road that stretches from Canada through Montana where we used to live, nearly to Mexico (it’s southern terminus is at Wickenburg AZ). Many Montanans used to sport bumper stickers reading “I drive Highway 93; Pray for Me!”

Snowy NV

More snow in Nevada, but as we descend from White Horse Pass (elevation 6,031 feet), the temps get warmer. Much of this countryside reminds me of eastern Montana, where I grew up (minus the mountains).

White River Narrows NV

Going through the White River Narrows–beautiful and fascinating rock formation and petroglyphs. White River Narrows is located approximately 150 miles north of Las Vegas and 90 miles south of Ely Nevada.  It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

H Jailhouse Ely NVWe spent the next night in Ely, NV and ate at a restaurant called The Jailhouse. Each table was in its own “cell” and the menu items were all named appropriately “Robbers Ribs” and the like.

After leaving Hwy93, we were once again on the Interstate, I-15 which took us to Las Vegas. We stopped there long enough to grab a burger on the run and gas up our vehicles. We were in a hurry to get to our new home! Due to the load in the pickup and the U-haul trailer, my husband was not able to travel as fast as we normally would, especially going uphill. I was following along in my little blue Chevy, with my cat sedated by my side.

Day 1 AZ Lavender sunset

Our first Arizona sunset the evening of Jan. 21 as we approach closer to Prescott.

Published in: on January 28, 2013 at 1:59 am  Comments (2)  
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Finding ‘Prescott Blue’

Over Memorial weekend, my DH and I visited our future retirement home near Prescott, AZ (pronounced like Press-kit). When my sister-in-law was there with us a year ago, we coined the color “Prescott Blue,” which is like no other sky–often not a cloud to be seen, just clear, vivid blue. While Phoenix was 90 degrees, Prescott was 60-70, with a cool breeze. And, they boast 300 days of sunshine, while we in the Pacific Northwest have 300 days of clouds.

We ate lunch one day at the Palace Restaurant and Saloon, on “Whiskey Row” in old-town Prescott. Opened in 1877, it is the oldest frontier saloon in Arizona, and has hosted such famous people as Wyatt and Virgil Earp and Doc Holiday. On July 14th, 1900, The Palace was destroyed by the Whiskey Row fire. The ornately carved 1880’s Brunswick Bar, which is still in use, was carried to safety across the street to the plaza by patrons, and the saloon was rebuilt for $50,000 within the next year. The movie “Junior Bonner” starring Steve McQueen was filmed there in 1971 as was a scene from “Billy Jack” and “Wanda Nevada.”

Prescott Courthouse and park hosted a juried art fair through the weekend. Arizona is celebrating it’s 100th anniversary of statehood this year.

Prescott-area terrain. It’s not just flat sandy desert, but is at 5,400 feet at the base of the Bradshaw Mountains and has a population of 40,000. Chino Valley is a small rural town 16 miles north of Prescott and that is where we will be relocating upon retirement.

Our Chino Valley neighborhood.

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